Daystate Genus PCP Special Edition

New Air Rifles

Air Rifles update.

Air Rifles ordered this last year has been a nightmare, both for the customers that ordered a Brocock PCP and us at Gunroom. Our UK order took 7 months and USA order; though still not here after 8 months, was due to leave the wholesaler by December 30. They didn’t say which year so maybe they mean 2018.

Air Rifle Freight from the USA has gone up from $120/gun to about $480/gun. This has resulted in us using DB Schenker who have come in and slashed the prices from both the USA and UK to Australia rates. You will see these price reductions when we upload the new pricing in January – ignore earlier prices that are on the website at the time of writing this (December 21, 2018).

We currently have a shipment of Daystate and Brocock air rifles in Customs right now. These air rifles include the Daystate Huntsman, Renegade, Red Wolf, TSAR and Wolverine plus the complete range of Brococks including the Snipers and Commanders. This stock order has only taken 2 months and a bit, which is good by historical standards.

Daystate’s Special 40th Edition Air Rifles; the Genus.

We have 2 of the Daystate Genus PCP air rifles allotted to us with a possible additional 2 units should we get orders for them. If you are interested in getting one of these numbered 40th Edition PCPs, please contact either Rob or me by email.

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary Edition Air Rifles

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary Edition

This PCP air rifle comes complete with Gold trim, shroud and silencer. However, any that we sell here will be modified so that the shroud is only cosmetic with a blank silencer – it will look identical but will provide no noise reduction. Sorry about that guys…

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary PCP Air Rifles

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary PCP

Current PCP Air Rifles in Stock Order.

The following are currently in Customs (22nd December 2018) and are the line up of PCP air rifles we wish to stay with for a while at least.

Daystate Huntsman PCP Air Rifles.

The new Daystate Huntsman is in the stock order in both .22 and .25 calibres. This PCP air rifle is by far the most popular Daystate available presently, partly popular due to its’ price that allows it to compete with Weihrauch ‘s HW100 and Brocock’s Sniper and Commander, but also due to its accuracy and reliability.

Daystate Regal HR PCP

Daystate Regal HR PCP

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Air Rifles

Alongside the Huntsman air rifles, we also have the now famous and sought after Red Wolf after its outstanding debut in the USA. While this is a rather expensive PCP air rifle, it does NOT disappoint in looks and performance. Having sold our first Red Wolf to Darren Burgess, the interest it aroused while it was here was unbelievable.

I am part way through an article on the Red Wolf and should have it published by mid-January. It is a multi-part article with a heap of images that should keep you interested. With great accuracy and a shot count of 270, these PCP air rifles will take some beating. We now have the Red Wolf in Black (70%) and Red (30%) laminate and also in the Walnut for the conservative buyer. Calibres coming into stock are the .22, .25 and .303 cal.

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Air Rifles

Daystate’s much sought after PCP air rifles, the Red Wolf in laminate and also in Walnut.

Daystate Red Wolf in Walnut

Daystate Red Wolf in Walnut

We have both the Wolverine R in High Power format and standard FAC, together with the laminated versions of the Wolverine R and Wolverine P in both .25 and .303 calibres.

Daystate WolverineR Grey Laminate PCP Air Rifles

Daystate WolverineR Grey Laminate PCP Air Rifle

Daystate TSAR (12 Fpe)

No Daystate line-up is complete without the Daystate TSAR, with each gun named after a Russian Emperor. This is only available in .177 and 12 Fpe, though I think I can probably re-rate it to 18 Fpe if someone wants to go that way.

The gun has obviously been designed, if not built, by Ataman rifles out of Russia. The similarities between the Daystate TSAR and the Ataman M2S Match can be seen here.

Daystate TSAR PCP Target Air Rifles

Daystate TSAR PCP Target Air Rifles

Ataman M2S Match PCP Air Rifles

Ataman M2S Match Laminated Air Rifle

Daystate Renegade PCP

Last on the list from Daystate is the Renegade HP HR in .25 cal. HP stands for High Power obviously with HR refers to the PCP having a Huma Regulator.

Daystate RenegadeR HP PCP Air Rifles

Daystate Renegade HP HR .25 cal

As can be seen, the Daystate Renegade PCP air rifle pictured here is in a dark green synthetic. Presently at the time of writing this, I am not sure whether the stock order has a green or black synthetic. I do have a Pulsar stock in a green laminate that should fit this gun if a customer so wishes to swap the stocks. The calibre of this air rifle is .25 cal and power is stated as 60 Fpe.

Daystate Pellets.

We are also carrying a range of Daystate pellets in .177, .22, .25 and .303 calibres. Due to the high cost of air freighting these pellets, we will limit the number per order to 5 tins.

Daystate Pellets for quality Air Rifles

Daystate Pellets for quality Air Rifles in  .303, .22 and .177

Brocock PCP Air Rifles.

Currently in Customs are the following Brocock PCPs:

Brocock Compatto MKII and Compatto Sniper.

These 2 Brocock Compatto PCP air rifles are definitely the best volume sellers we have. Why? Simply put, they are short, slim, well balanced, reliable and accurate, on top of that they are also cheap in the big picture.

Brocock Compatto MkII PCP Air Rifles

Brocock Compatto Sniper

Brocock Bantam Sniper PCPs.

This model of the Bantam Sniper is producing great shot counts coupled with accuracy as it is basically a Compatto with a large air tank, different stock and Huma Regulator.

Bantam Sniper MKII PCP Air Rifles

Brocock Bantam Sniper with MTC Scope

Brocock Commander Air Rifles.

The Commander is the all-new model from Brocock that comes with a tactical appearance that will appeal to the cowboys out there. The action is the same as the Bantam Sniper, just in a different stock with a Cerakote option.

Brocock Commander 480cc Carbon Bottle Air Rifles

Brocock Commander 480cc Carbon Bottle Air Rifle

Brocock Commander 480 Air Rifles

Brocock Commander 480 Air Rifle with MTC Scope

Brocock Commander 500 Black air rifles

Brocock Commander 500 Black Air Rifle

All Brococks are available in .177, .22 and .25 calibres and come with Huma Regulators where stipulated. However, we only have the .177 in the Compatto presently.

Aeon Scopes for Air Rifles.

We have an order of Aeon Scopes coming that includes 90% of their range. For those of you unfamiliar with Aeon, they come with a lifetime warranty and specialize mostly in the larger style of scopes. Like this10-60×60 HD Aeon Scope below:

Aeon 10 - 60x60 Scope suited to PCP air rifles

Aeon 10 – 60×60 Scope

MTC Scopes.

At the time of writing this, we have the complete range in stock with plenty of the Viper Pro MTC Scopes in 5-30×50.

MTC Viper Pro 10 x 44 scope for Air Rifles

MTC Viper Pro 10 x 44

Air Rifles Summary.

We currently stock Brocock, Daystate, Cometa and Weihrauch, with AirForce, Marauders and Dragon Claw .50 cal on the way (after 8 months…) here with DB Schenker, so you can be sure they get here this time.

I am off to the Las Vegas Shot Show on the 19th of January this year. Admission is restricted to the Gun Trade only, so hopefully, I can come away with some additional agencies and better pricing.

We will carry a range of AirForce, Benjamin, Kral and Sam Yang (Eun Jin aka Seneca) air rifles over the next year. Now that there are 3 of us working here, we may just be able to stay ahead of the curve with air rifles, sales and servicing.

Author

Ian McIntosh.

Compressor for PCP

PCP Compressor Review and Maintenance Tips

PCP Compressor Review and Tips.

Setting up your own PCP Compressor correctly will prolong the longevity of this great little High-Pressure PCP Compressor that we take for granted to fill our PCP air rifles. This PCP Compressor has the words Yong Heng Air Pump printed on the blue and sometimes black electric motor housing and comes in 4 models.

We import this PCP Compressor and perform a series of modifications and tests prior to releasing it for sale. Price at the time of writing this is $565.00 including GST, ready to connect and pump air with everything assembled and tested.

Setting up the PCP Compressor.

I am going to assume you have purchased your PCP Compressor from Gunroom in Brisbane and are about to connect it up. Firstly, the PCP Compressor has to be mounted LEVEL to the ground to ensure adequate lubrication from the ‘splash fed oil system’ they employ in the PCP Compressor.

Failure to do this may result in the Compressor overheating and possibly suffering piston or bearing damage from under lubrication. Check the oil level is correct.

 

PCP Compressor top view.

High-Pressure PCP Compressor

Overfilling the crankcase with oil may also result in the PCP Compressor dieseling: that is where oil bypasses the rings and ignites, causing the PCP Compressor to enter a ‘runaway mode’: this is where the Compressor actually runs on the bypass oil and the RPMs go through the roof until it breaks a con rod or something similar. Generally, the PCP Compressor disintegrates through over-revving.

 

Nulon Fully Synthetic Oil

Nulon Fully Synthetic Engine Oil 5 litres

 

Here is a note: I fill the oil in the PCP Compressor we sell with 5W-40W in Summer and 5W-30W in Winter, the oil is Fully Synthetic NULON. Do not mix it with mineral oil. Available at Repco and Cheap Auto Parts nationwide.

Next, you need to get a 30 or 40-litre container that has a lid, this stops bugs and what not drowning in the water and possibly blocking the small pump impellor (been there, done that). I recommend the clear plastic storage containers you get at BigW for around $12 when on special. Fit the pump by pressing it slightly on the bottom of the tank where the suction cups at each corner of the pump will hold it in place.

I then drill 2 x 10mm holes large enough to fit the 2 silicon hoses through them. You will need to remove the cable tie on the black plastic pipe fitting that goes into the pump outlet to get it through the 10mm hole. Then fit the silicone hose with the black plastic tube into the pump outlet socket after fitting a replacement cable tie.

The return hose has to stick through the lid by no more than 40mm, so it is clear of the water. On my tank lid I used Sikaflex to bond the silicone hoses in place on the plastic lid – silicone may work as well as Sika as it is 1/4 the price so I would try that first. Let the fittings and silicone cure overnight.

When you connect the power to the PCP Compressor, the pump should automatically start running providing you have plugged the pump cable into the compressor side. To help you see that water is circulating, I put a small bottle of food dye (red or blue) into the water. You can view the water circulating in the image below.

 

PCP Compressor water cooling tank

Dyed Water cooling flowing through a PCP Compressor

Should the pump stop working while the PCP Compressor is running, the water will run back providing the return pipe is above the water. That way, should you see clear silicon hoses (without the food dye running through them), you will immediately know the pump is not working and shut down the PCP Compressor. This is demonstrated in the following image.

 

 

Dyed water cooling system in PCP Compressor

Water cooling not running to the PCP Compressor.

 

The PCP Compressor will overheat very quickly without water cooling. Trust me here…

 

Felt pad on PCP Compressor pipe.

Felt rubbing pad on hot pressure pipe.

Note: You will see I put felt with 3 cable ties on the top PCP Compressor air pipe, that is not for looks, it is to save you from burning your arm when you reach over to dump the air. You can thank me another day.

On a cool day the PCP Compressor will top up a Brocock Compatto PCP tank from 50 Bar to 200 Bar in 40 seconds, so don’t walk away and leave the unit running. While these PCP Compressors are reliable, they should not be left alone if you believe in Murphy’s law.

I am often asked if they can fill a Scuba tank. The answer is yes, providing you have adequate water in the reservoir, a MINIMUM of 40 litres. Any less and the water will quickly heat sending the PCP Compressor temperature into the red (by Red, I mean in excess of 80 degrees).

Should the temp get up close to 80 degrees, just shut the PCP Compressor down and leave the pump running to pull down the head temperature of the PCP Compressor. Make sure you close off the Scuba tank and drop the air in the filling hose.

Note: Do NOT put ice in the water as some clowns do. The sudden cooling in the water jacket may pinch the final stage piston that gets really hot, then you will have problems.

The PCP Compressor Water Filter.

The filter supplied with the PCP Compressor, is in my opinion, too small for repeated fills, used in high humidity or left in place over repeated fills. It comes with small foam filters that are not really that efficient as they quickly fill with moisture. Further to that, they are expensive to buy if you can find a supplier.

The alternative? Meds, and I am not kidding you. These tampons are designed to trap moisture, they come with a string for removing them out of the filter housing (as well) and above all, they are plentiful and cheap. For those of you unfamiliar with tampons, Yes, you have to remove the plastic covers first…

The image below shows the replacement filters and the tampons for those of you who have lived under a rock for decades. Woolworths sell them for less than $5 for a pack of 8 with Chemists Warehouse selling a pack of 30 or more, for just a couple of bucks more.

Now at first glance, they may seem a bit thin, but don’t be fooled, they swell up with the first hint of moisture and you need the attached string to remove them. I use the Carefree SUPER (?) Tampons below and they work just fine for the heavy use my compressor gets.

 

Tampons used as compressor filter elements.

Filter inserts on left of tampons used as filter inserts.

 

Water is the enemy of PCPs and the filter is the only thing between your rifle getting rust in the action and/or the regulator and this PCP compressor. I advocate using a larger filter such as the one depicted below that comes with an extension whip hose making it easy to use.

However, if you are budget wise and only have the small filter that came with the compressor, use the tampons, change them regularly and you will be OK. The key words here are, “change them regularly…”, which is a pittance in cost to the damage water can do to your PCP. If you had a Daystate PCP, would you risk getting water in it? Of course not, so change the filters regularly.

 

Large water filter for PCP Compressor

High-Pressure water trapping compressor filter and extension whip hose

 

Tip: When draining the air from between the compressor and the PCP, dump the air FAST. This helps seat the non-return valve in the PCP cylinder due to a high-pressure differential. If you dribble about and let the air out slowly, occasionally you will get the valve being held open slightly by the through-passage of high-pressure air, draining your cylinder over a few minutes to a few hours.

Tip: Always leave both drain valves on the compressor OPEN when not in use. This allows any resident moisture to drain out or dry up.

Tip: You should dump air from the High-Pressure drain first and before the air is completely exhausted, then open the Low-Pressure drain next.

PCP Compressor Safety.

Not to put too much emphasis on safety guys, but this little compressor can pump to 4500psi (300 Bar) in no time at all, so ensure that any cylinders on PCP guns are within their ‘use by date’. 300 Bar cylinders mostly use a final date after which the cylinder must be thrown out and not be retested.

Having owned a Dive Shop in Port Hedland around 100 years ago, I am all too familiar with high-pressure air cylinders and resulting accidents due to complacency.

The compressor has a burst disc that goes off at around 4500+ psi but that won’t save you should you put 4500 psi (300 Bar) in a 200 Bar cylinder or a cylinder that is dodgy. I will be doing a full article on PCP Compressor safety shortly and it will include images designed to disturb you so as to let the realisation of high-pressure air danger sink in.

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Angled

Air Rifles in stock at Gunroom for the year of 2019

Air Rifles for 2019.

Air Rifles and scope purchasing this last year has been a nightmare, both for the customers that ordered and us at Gunroom. Our UK order of air rifles took 7 months and USA order; though still not here after 8 months, is due to leave the wholesaler by December 30. They didn’t say which year so maybe they mean 2018.

Air Rifles Freighted from the USA has gone up from $120/gun to about $480/gun. This has resulted in us using DB Schenker who have come in and slashed the prices from both the USA and UK to Australia rates. You will see these price reductions when we upload the new pricing of air rifles in January – ignore earlier prices that are on the website at the time of writing this (December 21, 2018).

We currently have a shipment of Daystate and Brocock air rifles in Customs right now. These air rifles include the Daystate Huntsman, Renegade, Red Wolf, TSAR, and Wolverine plus the complete range of Brococks including the Snipers and Commanders. This stock order has only taken 2 months and a bit, which is good by historical standards.

Daystate’s Special 40th Edition; the Genus PCP Air Rifles.

We have 2 of the Daystate Genus PCP airguns allotted to us with a possible additional 2 units should we get orders for them. If you are interested in getting one of these numbered 40th Edition PCPs, please contact either Rob or me by email.

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary Edition Air Rifle

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary Edition

These PCP air rifles come complete with Gold trim, shroud and silencer. However, any that we sell here will be modified so that the shroud is only cosmetic with a blank silencer – it will look identical but will provide no noise reduction. Sorry about that guys…

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary PCP Air Rifle

Daystate Genus 40th Anniversary PCP

Current Air Rifles in our Stock Order.

The following air rifles are currently in Customs (22nd December 2018) and are the line up we wish to stay with for a while at least.

Daystate Huntsman.

The new Daystate Huntsman is in the stock order in both .22 and .25 calibres. These PCP air rifles are by far the most popular Daystate available presently, partly popular due to their price that allows them to compete with Weihrauch’s HW100 and Brocock’s Sniper and Commander, but also due to its accuracy and reliability.

Daystate Regal HR PCP Air Rifle

Daystate Regal HR PCP

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Air Rifles.

Alongside the Huntsman air rifles, we also have the now famous and sought after Red Wolf PCP air rifles after their outstanding debut in the USA. While this is a rather expensive Daystate PCP air rifle, it does NOT disappoint in looks and performance. Having sold our first Red Wolf to Darren Burgess, the interest it aroused while it was here was unbelievable.

I am part way through an article on Red Wolf air rifles and should have it published by mid-January. It is a multi-part article with a heap of images that should keep you interested. With great accuracy and a shot count of 270, this PCP air rifle will take some beating. We now have the Red Wolf in Black (70%) and Red (30%) laminate and also in the Walnut for the conservative buyer. Calibres coming into stock are the .22, .25 and .303 cal.

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Air Rifle facing left

Daystate Red Wolf PCP

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Air Rifle Angled

Daystate Red Wolf PCP Angled

Daystate Wolverine (Laminated)

We have both the Wolverine R air rifles in High Power format and standard FAC, together with the laminated versions of the Wolverine R and Wolverine P in both .25 and .303 calibres.

Daystate WolverineR Grey Laminate PCP Air Rifle

Daystate WolverineR Grey Laminate

Daystate TSAR (12 Fpe) Target Air Rifles.

No Daystate line-up is complete without the Daystate TSAR, with each gun named after a Russian Emperor. This is only available in .177 and 12 Fpe, though I think I can probably re-rate it to 18 Fpe if someone wants to go that way.

Daystate TSAR PCP Target Air Rifle

Daystate TSAR PCP Target Air Rifle

The gun has obviously been designed, if not built, by Ataman air rifles out of Russia. The similarities between the Daystate TSAR and the Ataman M2S Match can be seen here.

Ataman M2S Match Laminated Air Rifle

Ataman M2S Match Laminated

Daystate Renegade Hunting Air Rifles.

Last on the list from Daystate is the Renegade HP HR in .25 cal. HP stands for High Power obviously with HR refers to the PCP having a Huma Regulator.

Daystate RenegadeR HP PCP Air Rifle

Daystate RenegadeR HP PCP

As can be seen, the Daystate Renegade PCP air rifles also come in a dark green synthetic. Presently at the time of writing this, I am not sure whether the stock order has a green or black synthetic. I do have a Pulsar stock in a green laminate that should fit this gun if a customer so wishes to swap the stocks. The calibre of this air rifle in .25 cal and power is stated as 60 Fpe.

Daystate Pellets.

We are also carrying a range of Daystate pellets in .177, .22, .25 and .303 calibres. Due to the high cost of air freighting these pellets, we will limit the number per order to 5 tins.

Daystate Air Rifle Pellets

Daystate Air Rifle Pellets

Brocock PCP Air Rifles.

Currently in Customs are the following Brocock PCP air rifles, that will mean we have the whole range in stock:

Brocock Compatto MKII and Compatto Sniper PCP air rifles.

These 2 Brocock Compatto PCP air rifles are definitely the best volume sellers we have. Why? Simply put, they are short, slim, well balanced, reliable and accurate, on top of that they are also cheap in the big picture. There is a Brocock Compatto Review on this site.

Brocock Compatto MkII Air Rifle

Brocock Compatto MkII

Brocock Bantam Sniper PCP Air Rifles.

This model of the Bantam Sniper is producing great shot counts coupled with accuracy as it is basically a Compatto with a large air tank, different stock, and Huma Regulator. It comes with a redesigned synthetic stock that handles very well indeed.

Bantam Sniper MKII PCP Air Rifle Left Facing

Bantam Sniper MKII Left Facing

Brocock Commander.

The Commander is the all-new model from Brocock that comes with a tactical appearance that will appeal to the cowboys out there. The action is the same as the Bantam Sniper, just in a different stock with a Cerakote option.

All Brococks are available in .177, .22 and .25 calibres and come with Huma Regulators where stipulated. However, we only have the .177 cal in the Compatto presently due to limited demand for this calibre.

Brocock Commander PCP air rifle

Brocock Commander PCP Air Rifles are available in Tan.

Aeon Scopes for PCP air rifles.

We have an order of Aeon Scopes coming that includes 90% of their range. For those of you unfamiliar with Aeon, they come with a lifetime warranty and specialize mostly in the larger style of scopes. Like this 10-60×60 HD Aeon Scope below, I expect to see many of these on PCP air rifles as time goes by.

Aeon 10 - 60x60 Scope for a Target Air Rifle

Aeon 10 – 60×60 Scope

MTC Scopes for air rifles.

At the time of writing this, we have the complete range in stock with plenty of the Viper Pro MTC Scopes in 5-30×50. To give you a better understanding of stock levels with MTC, if you want a large stock order for November, you have to place the order by February.

MTC Viper Pro 10 x 44 suiting a PCP air rifle

MTC Viper Pro 10 x 44

Air Rifles: Summary.

We currently stock PCP air rifles by Brocock, Daystate, Cometa and Weihrauch, with AirForce, Marauders and Dragon Claw .50 cal on the way (after 8 months…) here with DB Schenker, so you can be sure they get here this time.

I am off to the Las Vegas Shot Show on the 19th of January this year. Admission is restricted to the Gun Trade only, so hopefully, I can come away with some additional agencies and better pricing.

Gunshops wishing to sell our range of air rifles can do so via drop-shipping. We take over the sale and supply the customers (via the gunshop) and commission the dealer. The dealer has no issues with spares, service or warranty, as we warrant and test all our air rifles sold here.

We will carry a range of AirForce, Benjamin, Kral and Sam Yang (Eun Jin aka Seneca) air rifles over the next year. Now that there are 3 of us working here, we may just be able to stay ahead of the curve with air rifles, sales and servicing.

Author

Ian McIntosh.

Storage Safes at Gunroom

Safe Keeping of Firearms and what you should know

Safe-keeping of Firearms in Australia.

The term Safe-keeping of Firearms refers to the storage of firearms, air rifles included, for a prolonged period. Having recently received two air guns that were stored in a safe for just under a year, the owner was surprised to see the rust on them; to the point that even ‘breaking the barrel’ to insert a pellet was difficult. So, what went wrong?

One problem was humidity and the resulting damage that moisture can do. Another problem was the safe was situated in a basement area with poor ventilation and a damp atmosphere. Now, these air guns had been kept in this safe for years without any problems since they were used regularly, moisture was minimised by handling and outdoor activities. Then once they were left for a long period in a damp container, rust got hold of them.

The regular use of your firearm(s) and placement in a safe etc, may not alert you to the potential damage that humidity can do, so don’t let that fool you into leaving your guns unattended for a lengthy period. To show you just what I mean here, I placed these 2 disposable humidity canister traps (below), one in each 66-gun safe at my shop in Brisbane, for 6 weeks. Now my safes each were nearly full of guns and there were no large void areas, yet the following images show you just how much water was pulled out of the inside of each safe, and no, the doors were not left open for any prolonged periods of time.

Those of you living in Queensland who want to know more about storing your guns go to the safe-keeping of firearms Qld Police.

Disposable Humidity TrapsHumidity Traps with approx. 50mm of trapped water[/caption]

Yup, I know Brisbane gets humid but so do other places, some less and some more. Humidity can also be formed in warm weather in cooler areas of the house, such as a basement, so don’t overlook that possibility. Cold climates can also produce air-borne moisture producing rust within a gun safe, so don’t for one minute think that because your guns are locked away, they are potentially safe from rust.

The correct Safe-keeping of Firearms and Air Rifles in general.

Guys, while many of us look after our guns and wipe them down after use, the vast majority do not! Fingerprints containing oils and moisture are often visible on guns coming through Gunroom with the resulting breakdown, minimal at first, of the bluing.

Dust and dirt are other issues as some of these absorb moisture and transfer the resulting chemical action into and through the bluing. Bluing incidentally, for those of you new to guns, is a controlled oxidisation (rusting) of the steel. It is imperative to wipe down the bluing after use with a clean cloth or one that has a small residue of oil in it to take off marks. The gun does not need to be dripping in oil, a light smear polished back is sufficient.

There is another element to protecting your firearms and that is the correct safe size. As most safes are made in China, their method of calculating how many guns a safe will store, is bizarre, to say the least. In my opinion, a 7 Gun Chinese Safe will hold 5 guns at a squeeze and 3 or 4 comfortably, allowing you to remove them without scratching or marking the neighbouring firearms on each side.

It appears to me that the Chinese have not allowed for the rifle bolts sticking out the side nor have they allowed for scopes that seriously risk getting damaged when packing a gun safe to the marked capacity. I have 66 capacity gun safes that will hold around 40 air rifles without scopes and around 36 guns with scopes. Go figure….

Long Term Storage and Safe-keeping of Firearms.

Those of you considering Safe-keeping of firearms need to take storing them one step further than the above. That is, you need to wipe down the gun and put it in a heavy plastic tubular bag welded at one end, then squeeze out the excess air and wrap it tightly around the barrel securing it with a heavy rubber band. You can pick up a bag(s) free of charge when visiting my shop or when ordering any products online.

 

Storage Safes at GunroomStorage Safes at Gunroom[/caption]

Guns placed in a firearm safe without being crammed tightly together with sufficient air space between each firearm will minimise puncturing the bag and the possible frictional damage between guns. The safe used for Safe-keeping of firearms should also contain an efficient humidity trap to further reduce the risk of air-borne moisture.

Be careful with rags that have been soaked in oil or kerosene or similar as these can self-ignite when bundled tightly together. I put kerosene rags in an open coffee tin and oiled rags in a separate open coffee tin. I also place them where they will do little if any damage should ignition take place.

So, to summarise, long term air rifle storage or the safe-keeping of firearms for an extended period, you need to:
ensure the guns are wiped down,
place them in heavy tubular bags,
seal and store them in a moisture controlled gun safe with sufficient air space between each gun.
At Gunroom we individually check each air rifle, handgun or high powered rifle that has to be stored, prior to following the above 3 steps. The safe-keeping of firearms requires some attention to detail and due diligence if you are to avoid some of the above-mentioned pitfalls.

AirForce PCP Air Rifles

The American made AirForce Texan, Condor and Talon PCP air rifles are popular world-wide due to their power, accuracy and price and have built a reputation for reliability along the way. This very simple design and even simpler operating system has air rifle enthusiasts tuning, customising and adding accessories, a bit like ‘Barbie’ for Men.

Below I have the AirForce Talon over the Condor over the Texan to give you an idea of size.

AirForce Talon, Condor and Texan

AirForce Talon, Condor and Texan.

In this article I am going to touch on the AirForce Condor and Talon PCP air rifles due to their similarity with one another. The AirForce Texan I will leave for another article.

AirForce Condor

AirForce Condor with Hawke Airmax 30 Scope and Bi-Pod.

First impressions of the Texan, Condor and Talon PCPs.

My first thoughts when I saw an AirForce Condor and Talon was they looked too simple and more like a toy than a real PCP high power air rifle. Pick one up and your whole perception changes as it is very well balanced and solid air rifle with composite grips rather than wood. This departure from the ‘norm’ by using a pistol grip and an almost Military DNA has not been lost on other air gun manufacturers who have followed suite, taking a huge slice of the air gunning market in doing so.

All the AirForce Texan, Condor and Talon PCPs come in a flat black finish with 11mm rails on the ‘handle’ which takes the scope, forward of that to the barrel and underneath to accommodate accessories like a Bi-Pod or torch. The pistol grip is moulded composite with a very basic yet functional trigger and safety incorporated within the trigger guard while the chassis of the rifle is anodised flat black aluminium.

The high-pressure cylinder is directly behind the breach and functions as the butt with a detachable and adjustable butt pad – not really a pad but a simple plate. Due to the diameter of the cylinder I found it necessary to mount the scope using ‘High’ mounts so that I could get a good cheek weld and comfortable stance. Due to the light weight of these AirForce guns it is very easy to shoot off-hand and carrying one of these air rifles through the bush while out hunting is a bonus due to the light weight and ergonomics of the design.

Looking more closely at these AirForce PCP Air Rifles.

If we start with the air cylinder and move forward, there is a small air pressure gauge on one side and a filling nipple on the other side which is a Foster fitting.

AirForce Talon Breech

Close up of the Loading Arm, Trigger Assembly, Top Hat and contents Gauge.

Forward of the gauge pictured above, you will see the almost military style trigger and in front of that the safety which is automatically applied upon loading. The safety can be moved to ‘Fire’ with the trigger finger and be re-applied to ‘Safe’ just as easily.

The Texan, Condor and Talon are single shot, unregulated PCP air rifles that load very easily and quickly. Loading is accomplished by pushing forward on the top mounted bolt that is situated on the upper side of the housing so that it exposes the loading breech and Top Hat assembly. The image above shows the air rifle cocked and in the loading position, ready to accept a pellet manually. Pull back the bolt and slide it either left or right into a detent machined into the chassis and it is ready to go.

The silver Top Hat you see in the Condor/Talon image above is the key to the power of the AirForce Condor and Talon PCP air rifles: it sits in front of what I would describe as an air control valve; that is depressed into the air chamber valve by a hammer that impacts it under the bolt when fired. When you push the bolt forward, you are in fact compressing the hammer spring and moving the hammer into the forward position. Upon firing, the internal hammer slides back and impacts the Top Hat that in turn momentarily enters the air chamber valve and releases a high-pressure charge of air that propels the pellet. The AirForce Texan is but a much larger version of both the Condor and Talon as it handles much larger projectiles.

AirForce PCPs also have a power regulator on the front left side as seen in the image below. Power is regulated by turning the micrometer style wheel that is numbered 1 to 16, this in turn moves an indicator along a slide to the right of the wheel, numbered 1 to 12. Understand this, the power regulator does NOT regulate the gun from “0” to “100%”, it only regulates it through a10-25% power base, depending on the tune of the air rifle.

Power and speed adjustment does not stop there as you can add shims behind the Top Hat or alternatively, wind the Top Hat in or out and re-secure with the 2 grub screws. There are also aftermarket Top Hats with large ports that can increase the power substantially or reduce the power by fitting different air jets into the Top Hat port.

Changing the Top Hat to a tuned version is my preferred method and then tuning this by adding shims or regulating jets will get you the speed or power you want. Changing out the Top Hat takes about 20 seconds if you have 2 flat faced screwdrivers handy. Adding shims or taking some out will add another 20 seconds or so, can’t be easier than that, can it?

For you guys interested in Tuning AirForce Guns for speed or power, my next article on the AirForce Condor and Talon is entirely about tuning, whether you are after 100 ft lbs energy out of the Condor or you want a high shot count between refills, I will show you how it is done.

PCP Power Adjuster

Condor Side-wheel Power Adjuster

The feature video below is on the AirForce Condor SS which is a noise supressed version of the standard Condor that we have here in Australia. The fundamentals are the same with the exception that the SS is shrouded, so please watch these 2 videos for a good insight to the overall performance of the Condor.

 

 

 

AirForce Condor and Talon Specification.

Condor PCP

AirForce Condor with Hawke Scope and folded Bi-Pod

AirForce Condor
Length OA: 980mm
Barrel Length: 600mm
Barrel: Made by Lothar Walther
Available Calibres: .177, .20, .22, .25.
Weight OA: 2.904 kilos
Air Reservoir Volume: 490cc
Fill Pressure 200 Bar
Air Reservoir Total Length (excluding Mts) and Diameter: 328mm x 60mm
Condor .22 Cal with H&N Baracuda 21.14g gave 1162 FPS (354.18 MPS) and 63.40 Ft lbs. Energy (85.98 Joules).
Condor .25 Cal with H&N Baracuda 21.14g gave 1090 FPS (332.23 MPS) and 81.86 Ft lbs. Energy (111.01 Joules).
AirForce factory standard results with Power Wheel set to Max.

 

Talon Air Rifle

AirForce Talon with Hawke Airmax 30 Scope and folded Bi-Pod

 AirForce Talon
Length OA: 827mm
Barrel Length: 400mm
Barrel: Made by Lothar Walther
Available Calibres: .177, .20, .22, .25.
Weight OA: 2.635 kilos
Air Reservoir Volume: 490cc
Fill Pressure 200 Bar
Air Reservoir Total Length (excluding Mts) and Diameter: 328mm x 60mm
Talon .22 Cal with H&N Baracuda 21.14g gave 888 FPS (270.66 MPS) and 37.02 Ft lbs. Energy (50.21 Joules).
Talon .25 Cal with H&N Baracuda 21.14g gave 793 FPS (241.71 MPS) and 43.33 Ft lbs. Energy (58.76 Joules).
AirForce factory standard results with Power Wheel set to Max.

Caveat: Please note that the exact air pressure, relative temperature and humidity will all play a part in the output speeds of any air rifle.

Summarising the AirForce PCPs.

If you are looking for a lightweight and fully self tunable PCP for hunting or target work, then you must look at these PCP air rifles guys, trust me here, they are a lot of fun. I will be able to supply you with what tuning bits you want to allow you to tune them yourselves or I can do it for you, your call.

We are all too familiar with pellet choice when one is looking for accuracy, then if you fall into this category of searching for precision, then consider this: these AirForce PCPs allow you to adjust the speed/power through the power control on the side, after-market Top Hats and shims, regulator, sizing jets and different barrel lengths. I can’t say that many other air rifle manufacturers can give you a product that versatile when it comes to customizing as does the AirForce range of PCPs.

Brocock Bantam from Gunroom, Part 2 of 2.

The Brocock Bantam PCP Range.

Following the introduction of the Brocock Compatto into Australia, they have now followed up with the Brocock Bantam in several different power and air cylinder packages and a choice of wood or synthetic on a modern design of their ladder frame stock. Then, more recently they have changed to the MKII models and introduced a new air rifle, the Commander which will be to feature of another review in August 2018.

At the time of writing this, I have on order more of the extremely popular Compattos and a range of Brocock Bantam MKIIs that should arrive late July 2018. Those of you with an interest in the Brocock Compatto or the new Bantam PCPs, please contact me early as these Brocock PCPs disappear very quickly.

The Brocock Bantam CF PCP.

This Brocock Bantam CF PCP air rifle comes with a Carbon Fibre wrapped air cylinder of 480cc that is just over 3 times the capacity of the Brocock Compatto air cylinder. This increase in air capacity is going to notch up the shots per air fill from that of the Compatto that we have found to be 48+ shots on the High-Power setting. Before you get out your calculator to do the maths on this, save yourself the trouble because it will not work out at 3.2 x 48 Shots because of the increase in power with the Bantam (and so more air).

Some of the first things you will notice when comparing the Bantam PCP with the Compatto apart from the air cylinder, is the side mounted air gauge and the adjustable cheek piece.

I shall be reviewing each of these new bantams once they get in and as usual I will give you the results, be they good or bad. In saying this however, the Compatto with it’s slim line air cylinder is a joy to fire, very accurate and with 48 usable shots it is comparable to the Weihrauch HW100K. Put up the energy by 5 Fpe and with the increase the shot count, the Brocock Bantam will eclipse the HW100K’s shot count as well the larger and more powerful HW100 while equalling the latter’s energy output.

By fitting the Bantam air rifle with a carbon wrapped bottle the overall weight will be reduced somewhat and that will be more noticeable in the balance than in carrying it. The 2 images below are the synthetic ladder frame stocks similar to what we have seen in the Compattos. These differ in the fact that they have an adjustable cheek piece and a wider fore-end to accommodate the fatter air cylinder. It is worth noting that the Bantams with the synthetic stocks are referred to a “soft touch” while the Brocock Compatto is referred to as a Polymer stock. I will elaborate on any difference when these guns arrive here.

Brocock Bantam CF

Brocock Bantam CF Model in ‘soft touch’ synthetic.

Bantam CF

Brocock Bantam CF

Based on the Bantam above there is also this stained Beech wood stock for those purists who haven’t yet made the transition from wood to synthetics. Set against the matt black action and shroud the wood does have an appeal that is difficult to overlook.

Bantam CF in Beech

Brocock Bantam CF in Beech

Brocock Bantam CF Beech Stock

Bantam CF in Beech with a MTC Viper Connect

The Brocock Bantam 400.

Below is the Soft Touch version of the Brocock Bantam PCP with a 400cc air cylinder. What the advantages or disadvantages are between the 400cc and the 480cc carbon wrapped bottle I have yet to establish, apart from cost that is.

Bantam 400 Facing Left

Bantam 400 ‘soft touch’ synthetic.

Brocock Bantam 400 synthetic

Brocock Bantam 400.

The Bantam 400 in wood below looking much like the Bantam CF model with the exception of the air cylinder.

Bantam 400 with Beech Stock

Beech Stock On A Bantam 400

Brocock Bantam 400 Beech

Bantam 400

The Brocock Bantam 500 PCP with the large capacity Cylinder.

One look at this PCP and you can see where Brocock are going with this large air cylinder that will surely benefit the .25 Calibre shooters in shot count. The .25 Cal does not come with the sling-shot ‘self regulating’ inertia hammer of the Compatto, but with a solid hammer to squeeze out 40 Fpe of energy with a 40+ shot count.

With the market moving away from springers and into PCP air rifles we have also noticed a shift upwards into .25, .30 and .357 cal air rifles. With Brocock now establishing their footprint on the .25 cal PCPs and Daystate having the Wolverine 303 in .30 cal, Gunroom Pty Ltd will be stocking these as they become available, as I find these larger calibre PCPs more attractive for the hunting fraternity.

Bantam 500 Facing Left

Brocock’s Bantam 500

Brocock Bantam 500 synthetic

Right side view of the Bantam 500

The Brocock Bantam 500 looks quite foreboding in Beech with the large cylinder fitted and should prove to be a good hunting air rifle with the additional power and shot count.

Bantam 500 with Beech Stock

Bantam 500 in Beech

Brocock Bantam 500 Beech

MTC Viper Connect on a Bantam 500

Brocock Bantam line up summary.

Brocock’s line up of PCP air rifles now starts at the Compatto in synthetic followed by the Bantam 400, the 480CF and the 500 in .177, .22 and .25 Calibres. The Bantam range also offers the Beech stock variant from the soft touch synthetic. However, the new MKIIs are dropping the Beech and Soft Touch stocks in the Bantams and only becoming available in a newly designed synthetic model. The Compatto will still retain its synthetic stock but will also have an optional Soft Touch version.

Those of you looking at the Bantam range as a future PCP purchase will no doubt have noticed the MTC Viper Connect scope used on all the above Brocock Bantams. This is an upmarket scope developed principally for the PCP market where weight and optics are paramount. Gunroom Pty Ltd will be offering the MTC Viper Connect and the MTC Viper-Pro scopes in package deals with the new Brocock Bantam MKII models when they arrive in July 2018.

Brocock Bantam from Gunroom, Part 1 of 2.

Brocock Bantam now available in all calibres.

The Brocock Bantam follows closely in the footsteps of the Brocock Compatto PCP air rifle with several added features, with the most prominent being an adjustable Cheek plate, and a larger cylinder and hence a better shot count. By using a larger cylinder on the Brocock Bantam the power output has been increased on several models, most notably the .25cal that is now fitted with a solid hammer and is rated at 40 Fpe.

The Brocock Bantam HiLite Soft-touch.

Brocock has released the 480cc air cylinder as a carbon wrapped version that is lighter than the 500cc model that we bring in by 100 grams. Sporting the Brocock Compatto logo on the side of the action, one can see the Compatto DNA has influenced this design markedly.

The first thing we noticed about the Brocock Bantam HiLite is the apparent slight shift in weight towards the shoulder, a wider fore-end grip and what feels like a lighter gun than the Brocock Compatto, when in fact the weights are fairly close. The Compatto weighs in at 3.17 Kgs and theBrocock HiLite at 2.9 Kgs plus scope, mounts and accessories.

Below you will see the Brocock Bantam HiLite fitted with an MTC Viper Connect scope on a Soft-touch stock. The stock is NOT synthetic but actually, a wood stock coated with a rubber compound that actually feels soft to touch and makes carrying and shooting this a dream.

Bantam HiLite Soft-Touch

Brocock Bantam HiLite Soft-touch viewed on the right right side.

Brocock Bantam HiLite Soft-touch

Brocock Bantam HiLite Soft-touch viewed on the left side.

The Brocock Bantam HiLite Soft-touch also sports the fill gauge on the left side of the stock making it quicker and easier to use; safer too for those clowns that insist on sticking their heads directly over the barrel of their PCP Air Rifle with gauges mounted at the end of their cylinders. The filler on the Brocock Bantam is directly under the fore-grip just forward of the trigger guard and is accessed by removing a magnetic cover. The probe under this is a typical Foster fitting, however, accessing this easily is best done using the extended sleeve provided with the air rifle as your fingers will have trouble releasing the fitting when full.

The Brocock Bantam PCP air rifles come with an adjustable check rest on all models coming into Australia and an adjustable butt pad, making these rifles extremely comfortable to shoot. The low weight of the Brocock Bantams is immediately evident when you pick one up, thanks again to some unique engineering in both the frame and stocks. They also use the same 10 shot magazine that comes with the Compatto.

Brocock Bantam HiLite in Beech.

Those guys of you out there who are not into synthetics or soft-touch rifle stocks will be pleased to know that Brocock Bantam also has the HiLite in Beech. Weight is the same as the soft-touch with the only differences being the feel and of course the aesthetics.

Both the Beech and the HiLite stocks are still subject to marking and denting through careless handling whereas the Brocock Compatto with the synthetic stock can withstand abuse with less visible damage. Repairing the Beech stock in the event of scratching or denting it is much like any other rifle stock and a quick search of YouTube will give you a wealth of information. The Soft-touch Brocock Bantam stock is slightly more complicated and I shall follow up shortly with repairing this rubberised finish for those of you unfortunate enough to damage one.

Bantam with Beech Stock

Brocock Bantam HiLite Beech Stock right side.

Brocock Bantam in Beech

Brocock Bantam HiLite Beech Stock viewed left side.

Brocock Bantam 500cc Model.

This Brocock Bantam below is fitted with a Beech stock and a 500cc cylinder making it fractionally cheaper than the carbon wrapped bottle that is marginally smaller in capacity. Having recently sold one in .177 cal FAC that produced several hundred shots per fill you begin to appreciate the Sling-Shot hammer fitted to these Brococks.

Bantam with 500cc Cylinder

Brocock Bantam 500cc Beech Stock viewed right side.

Brocock Bantam 500cc Beech Stock left side.

Brocock Bantam 500cc Beech Stock viewed left side.

This 500cc model featured above is in stock in .25 cal with a solid hammer delivering 40Fpe and in .22 cal delivering 30+Fpe with a slingshot hammer. You need to bear in mind that the models of Brocock that we import are FAC rated and take a charge of 240 Bar and not 200 Bar as printed in the literature that comes with them.

I can, of course, supply you with a 500cc model with a soft-touch stock should you be chasing a .25 cal PCP Air Rifle. As this 500cc model is around $200+ cheaper than the HiLite models I will also hold a limited number of .177 and .22 in this configuration. The Soft-touch features below.

Brocock Bantam 500ccc Soft-touch

Brocock Bantam 500cc Soft-touch right side.

Soft-touch Bantam 500cc

Brocock Bantam 500cc Soft-touch viewed left side.

While Brocock also makes a 400cc version as above, these will only be imported as a special order and that will also apply to those of you chasing a 12Fpe Bantam or Compatto in a similar configuration.

Note that the Brocock Bantams and Compattos in FAC come out at 18Fpe in .177 calibre and then you still have the option of dialling the power down to Medium or Low. What power you get then will depend largely on your selection of pellet as the power tends to vary a bit gun to gun through this selector. Should you buy a .177 in 18Fpe and definitely want the option of shooting in <12Fpe competition and still have the available 18Fpe for hunting in high mode, let me know at the time of purchase and I will adjust and set up the rifle specifically for you – no cost.

Brocock Bantam Summary.

The Brocock Bantam PCP air rifles will suit those of you into hunting as they not only have the power and accuracy, but the ergonomics of this PCP allows for comfortable carrying over extended periods of time. Put that together with the lightweight and semi bullpup configuration of the Bantam mounted with one of the MTC Scopes and you have a very versatile package that is competitively priced.

Tuning the Brocock Bantam for accuracy will be covered in future articles as I will show you what options you have and the effects of adjusting the slingshot hammer. I am also developing a Special Edition Brocock Bantam model that will be available as a fully tuned PCP package complete with pellet test results, an MTC scope and hard-case that comes ready to compete or hunt with.

Hawke Scopes and Accessories.

Hawke Scopes are now in stock at Gunroom together with a range of Hawke Accessories on this site that are available ex-stock as listed. While we deal predominantly in Air Rifles we are also catering across the board for all firearms when it comes to supplying Hawke products.

Hawke’s Range of Scopes

Hawke Range of Scopes

Should you be searching for a Hawke Scope that you do not see on our list of products then I urge you to email me directly or call me on 0421 733 818 or Land Line 07 3279 0031.

Hawke Scopes for Rifles and Air Rifles.

We are building up our stock of Hawke Scopes and Accessories that cater for all rifle types with a range of obscure scope mounting rings (reach forward, cantilever and tactical), adapter bases and sun shades always in stock. So, if you have one of those awkward to mount scopes that just wasn’t meant to fit your rifle without some serious after-market mounts, then please check our products section under Hawke Scopes.

As demand increases along with turnover we shall introduce additional scopes and accessories to meet demand while at present we are keen to meet the demand of the air rifle fraternity initially. To those of you reading this that would like to see us stock a scope or accessory, then please reach out to me as I would like to hear about it.

Hawke Airmax EV

The most popular Hawke Scopes would be the Airmax range which have been developed by Hawke specifically for Air Rifles and come with a 20% wider field of view. To assist Air Rifle enthusiasts Hawke have developed the MAP6 that you can use with Hawkes Ballistic Reticle Calculator (BRC) that you can download here on BRC. Another download that may well interest you as the reader here, is the ChairGun Pro which is Pellet Trajectory Software that you can download here on CGP.

The Hawke Airmax range of scopes are very well priced and well suited for the average air gunner who is into target or field hunting of small vermin. The Airmax Scope right out of the box will do everything you ask of it in these circumstances as these scopes work well on springers as well as PCPs. If you want to take your accuracy up a notch, then I seriously suggest that you download the Hawke BRC and have a play with it.

The Airmax 30 IR SF Scope released here in Australia has been very popular and without fault so far. Looking at the specs this looks to be an ideal field hunting scope for small vermin. If you go to the Downloads section of this site, you will find a PDF file called Airmax 30 IR SF (1).pdf that you can view or download/print.

Hawke Vanguard in HW77KSE

Weihrauch HW77KSE with Hawke Airmax 4-12 x 50 Scope.

Sidewinder 30

For those Air Rifle enthusiasts that are into long range shooting, competition or serious hunting, then providing you have a quality springer (like the long range Weihrauch HW77/HW77SE) or PCP Air Rifle (Weihrauch HW100S/T/K for example), then I think you need to look at a Hawke Sidewinder 30. These Hawke Scopes have a large 4-inch (100mm) Range wheel that provides accurate and easy focusing with your fingers while on target. The range wheel can be left off should you be concerned about damaging it while in the bush.

Sidewinder on HW100T

Weihrauch HW100T with Hawke Sidewinder 8-32 x 56 Scope.

Hawke Sidewinder on HW77KSE

Weihrauch HW77SE with Hawke Sidewinder 8-32 x 56 Scope.

These Hawke Sidewinder Scopes are suitable for most rifles and are not restricted to Air Rifles. They used to come packaged in an aluminium box complete with the focus wheel and lens sunshade, but that has now given way to a sturdy cardboard box. The Sidewinder Scope has an IR Reticle (Illuminated Reticle – Red/Black/Green) and comes with 1⁄2 Mil Dot or SR Pro versions.

Hawke Vantage IR

A very nice all round scope that is not bulky yet is full of features well suited to the larger Air Rifle enthusiasts or the rim and centre fire guys. I have matched this scope up with the Weihrauch HW60J and HW66 as a great field scope combination.

What is even more surprising about the Hawke Sport Scopes is their price, which makes them an attractive proposition for those of you chasing a quality scope and a lean budget.

Hawke Vanguard on HW60J

Weihrauch HW60J and Hawke Vantage 4-12 x 50 Scope.

Nite-Eye Digital

For the hunter who is serious about his shooting, this is an obvious choice due to its ability to perform well in low light conditions, such as early morning, evening and overcast environments. Available in MAP 6A, 1⁄2 Mil Dot, SR6 and SR12 this scope has you covered and when used with Hawke’s BRC you have an environmentally conditioned hunting scope.

NE Digi-IR 4-16x44 Scope

Hawke NE DIGI-IR 4-16 x 44 Half Mil Dot

Hawke Varmint SF

A long range hunting and target scope with 1⁄2 Mil Dot reticle with a side focus wheel and 44mm lens on a 1” tube that is rated for all firearm calibres. We recommend this scope for the rim and centre fire enthusiasts with its low profile and slim lines that make it a great field scope.

Varmint scope on HW66

HW66 Production and Hawke Varmint 4-14 x 44SF Scope

Hawke Scopes and Accessories

As you know, carrying scopes is not the full package and one has to supplement the scope stock with supporting accessories such as scope mounts, sunshades, lasers and mounts, Picatinny and Weaver rails and shooting accessories such as software, all available at Gunroom. This said, we do carry a good range of Hawke Match Mounts presently to cater for some of those obscure mounting issues that are cropping up with regularity.

Hawke Accessories Range

The NEW Hawke Scopes 2018

Hawke have upgraded their entire range of scopes by dropping the Sport range and introducing the Vanguard series in its place. There is the line-up of Hawke Airmax scopes with the AMX reticle while Hawke also maintains its Airmax 30 and Sidewinder 30 ranges of scopes.

I will be doing a series of short blogs on each of the Hawke scopes that I carry and will supplement the series with a more in-depth article on the new range of scopes.

The Hawke Sidewinder ED 10-50×60 Scope.

This Hawke Sidewinder ED scope is the latest release that we have purchased from Hawke and it is every bit as good as they claimed, in fact I think it is better. This is one large scope with 60mm objective in a 30mm tube that houses the new TMX reticle.

I think this scope is very well suited to long range shooting from some of the better PCP Air Rifles like the Weihrauch HW100, Brocock, Daystate and of course AirForce.

Hawke Sidewinder ED

Hawke Sidewinder ED 10-50×60 TMX showing the Airmax 30SF style Illuminator and Dust Caps

Hawke have learned lessons from the Airmax 30SF as one can clearly see some of the same componentry used in the Sidewinder ED. Some of this is no doubt due to the benefits derived by economies of scale and commonality of parts but also because these components work well in the 30SF. The adjustable illuminated step-less angled turret and the alloy dust covers that are locked in with the help of ‘C’ tools that are supplied, are already used in the Airmax 30SF.

Hawke Sidewinder and box

A Hawke Sidewinder ED on Packaging Box

What rifles would use the Sidewinder ED?

There are going to be those who react and say, ‘who needs a scope that powerful?”. Answer, me for one, my eyes aren’t like they were 40 years ago….. However, I like shooting out at distances of 100 metres or more using a PCP and at the end of the day, magnification, clarity, an excellent thin etched glass reticle and a large objective all contribute to accuracy and visible shot placement.

Weihrauch HW100TSE with Hawke Sidewinder

Hawke Sidewinder ED fitted on a Weihrauch HW100TSE with FX Air Tank and Air Shredder.

Try hitting a 5-cent coin at 100 metres with a wire reticle scope as used on some cheaper designs and you will find the coin is eclipsed by the thickness of the reticle. Not so with this scope as the optics are first class and makers of established scopes should be looking over their shoulders as Hawke scopes are fast coming of age and quality.

As I predominantly sell air rifles/PCPs this scope is perhaps too large for most them; but if you own a quality PCP like Weihrauch, Brocock, Daystate or AirForce, and you intend shooting out to the next level where a degree of skill is required, then maybe you should look at a Hawke Sidewinder. Anyone reading this who has a centre-fire will immediately see the advantage of using a x50 ED scope on distances out over 400 metres. I wouldn’t fit it to a springer due to the limited range of a spring gun and the cost ratio of the scope versus the cost of the spring air gun, as this is not a cheap scope in price or construction.

Hawke Sidewinder on HW100TSE

Weihrauch HW100TSE with Sidewinder ED

The Scope un-boxed.

As can be seen from the image below, the Hawke Sidewinder scope now comes in a well made cardboard box and not in the Aluminium box of the past that used to house the Sidewinders of yesterday. In the box there are two ‘C’ tools for adjusting the flip up alloy dust covers and a 2-pin knob used for tightening up the low profile knurled nut that secures the side-wheel. There is also a sunshade extension and a 100mm side-wheel that can be fitted to allow very small adjustments to be made taking out parallax, due in part to the large diameter of the wheel that also hosts distances in yards.

Hawke Sidewinder ED un-boxed

Hawke Sidewinder ED un-boxed.

There is no point in fitting the side-wheel if you are comfortable just using the left side turret cap to focus but serious target shooters have come to realise its advantages. In some of these images you will see that I fitted the optional side-wheel that is 150mm in diameter, as this allows even smaller adjustments to be made with pin-point accuracy. The larger diameter allows for very precise adjustment to eliminate parallax error with greater accuracy, a key factor when tuning a PCP Air Rifle for distance shooting.

Note: Due to the size of the 150mm side-wheel, care must be taken not to load the side-wheel by leaning it against something while attached to the rifle or lying it down whilst under the rifle. As there is a large leverage effect that the wide side-wheel can impose on the turret shaft when supporting a rifle’s weight, damage may result. The same can be said about protecting the scope’s objective, especially when fitted with a sunshade: this poses a long unsupported scope tube that will transfer any load on it by several multiples that can’t be good.

Side View of Hawke Sidewinder Ed

Side view of the Hawke Sidewinder ED

The Sidewinder ED Reticle.

The etched glass reticle harbours some very fine lines and numbers not found on many other scopes. Buying a scope of this quality and expense dictates that you should understand the reticle and just how to use it to the best advantage possible.

TMX Reticle Hawke Sidewinder

Hawke Sidewinder ED TMX Reticle

The Sidewinder ED comes with ¼ MOA geared turrets and optional 1/8th MOA or 1/10th Mrad can be purchased separately for those guys who shoot to 5 decimal places.

1/8th MOA Turrets for Sidewinder ED

Replacement Geared 1/8th MOA Turrets

1/10th MRAD Turrets for Sidewinder ED

Replacement Geared 1/10th MRAD Turrets

Suitability of the Sidewinder ED.

This Hawke Sidewinder ED will likely find its’ niche with bench-rest shooters of PCPs and centre fire rifle owners who participate in extreme range targets. For myself, shooting a good group at 100 metres takes skill, a good PCP and a great scope in that order. I know quite a few of my customers who will dig deep to buy one of these scopes for the advantages it offers apart from cosmetic.

As for the zoom factor, one doesn’t need to run around all day with the scope zoomed up to the max as 10 power if quite OK for much of the shooting done today as it is.

Hawke Sidewinder Summary.

At the end of the day the Hawke Sidewinder ED fitted with a 150mm side-wheel makes an imposing sight that is in fact in keeping with its impressive performance. Having not fired too many shots using this Hawke Sidewinder ED scope I can say this, ‘what I have fired has impressed me no end’, to the point I will buy one for myself.