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The Weihrauch HW100 part 2

This article is part 2 of a multi part series on the Weihrauch HW100T and HW100S where I will bring you some more of the practical aspects of the PCP rifle. I will attempt to cover most issues I have experienced with the HW100, however, if you the reader would like me to cover a specific subject or you may like to share some info for our air rifle fraternity, please contact me.

The most common questions.

There are probably 3 very common questions asked about the Weihrauch PCP air rifles, being, not in any kind of order, the following:

  1. What is the price?
  2. How many shots per refill?
  3. What is the power?

I agree that there are plenty of other questions asked but these 3 are usually the opening gambit of prospective buyers.

Let’s look at the price and what you get or don’t get with the air rifle package. The rifle comes boxed in a cardboard box with polystyrene inserts, very rugged and I have yet to see any rifle damaged when it turns up here. Inside, the HW100 comes wrapped in a plastic sleeve with a rubber band sealing the open end from moisture or dirt ingress.

Next to the air rifle is the Air Cylinder that is separately wrapped and cocooned in a polystyrene recess to limit its movement during freighting. The Air Cylinder comes with a plastic dust cover over the threaded end that screws into the rifle and a plastic probe that fits into the filling orifice behind the gauge. Try not to lose this little plug as they are difficult to come by and expensive, somewhere around $18 – $22 depending on how it was freighted. At the end of the polystyrene moulding we have a small cardboard box that contains the following:

 

  1. Weihrauch HW100 14 shot magazine2 x 14 shot rotary magazines
  2. 1 DIN adapter that allows you to fill the bottle (once taken off the rifle) by screwing it directly into the adapter fitting. This is hardly used now and was more effective with the early cylinders that did not have the quick fill function using a probe while still fitted to the gun.
  3. There is another large fitting at the other side of the box with a screw thread through the centre and a matching cylinder thread. This can be screwed onto the cylinder and then the centre screw tightened inwards thus depressing the valve and allowing the high pressure air to escape. You would only use this function if you want to empty the cylinder.
  4. Lastly there is a filling probe with a 1/8th Gas thread that will fit a hand pump, much like the Hill PCP Pump or a SCUBA adapter for decanting air directly from a high Pressure SCUBA bottle.

The price is available from my Price List and as prices are somewhat fluid, I won’t quote it here. For those of you just new to this site, you should know that I test every rifle prior to sending it out to make sure it is indeed serviceable and meets the accuracy criteria for that particular model.

I can just here some of you guys saying, “then why charge $60 for a Pellet Selection Test???” when you have already tested the rifle. Good point, except that I ONLY test each rifle using H&N Baracuda Pellets and nothing else, no Chronograph or other pellets, furthermore, I do not document my results as it takes enough time unpacking, checking contents and setting up to test fire the rifle without making more work for myself. The targets are trashed once I am satisfied that the gun is OK accuracy wise.

HW100KT Facing to the right

HW100KT

The optional pellet test is just that, ‘optional’, but it allows me to try a minimum of 6 pellet types to see which ones perform the best. The Chronograph results are then put into Excel and a series of technical aspects are derived from these Chronograph results in the form of Graphs that pinpoint the specific pellet type that is most suitable for the air rifle at this specific time. The rifle may use another type of pellet for optimum results down the track a way, say after 1500 shots or so, but at the point of sale it shoots best with the selected pellet.

How many shots per fill with the Weihrauch PCPs?

For this article I have taken a Weihrauch HW100T and a HW100KT and test fired them both using a number of different air cylinders. Firstly I tested the HW100KT with the air cylinder that it came with, then I tested the HW100T with the small air cylinder from the HW100KT to note any difference in performance overall. This was followed with the HW100T with the regular air cylinder and lastly the HW100T was tested with the lightweight FX 390mm air cylinder.

Weihrauch air rifle accessories

Weihrauch Air Rifle Accessories.

Shooting was done at 20 metres and I was resting the rifle on a sand bag. I was not looking at getting accuracy as I was achieving a reasonable group at a firing rate of 1 shot every 4-5 seconds. If I had the time to dick around I could easily halve the grouping but I neither have the time or need for this type of accuracy for this test.

With the reasonably fast shooting I am quickly appraised of pellet drop and I do note at what point this begins happening and at what point it is unacceptable. The pellet groups on the targets tell that tale without having to strive for a ¼” group which would take time and provide little if any additional benefit, as the sole purpose of this exercise is to determine how many effective shots per cylinder….

The Graph below here is of a standard Weihrauch HW100KT with the air cylinder filled to 200 Bar on a cold day with the Temperature at 19° Centigrade. I am going to put in a caveat here and that is the unreliability of pressure gauges on any PCP air rifle, so please get your filling gauge calibrated at least and then mark the PCP gauge or do whatever it takes to make you comfortable with the readings on your air rifle.

Weihrauch PCP Air Cylinders

FX Air Cylinder Top, Weihrauch Large and Small Air Cylinders below.

Weihrauch HW100KT Shot Count Graph

Weihrauch HW100KT Shot Count.

Next I have the Weihrauch HW100T fitted with the small .105 Litre air cylinder from the HW100KT above and note the very different results.

Weihrauch HW100 shot Count Graph

Weihrauch HW100T with .105 Litre Air Cylinder

The HW100T with the standard .175 Litre air cylinder provide greatly differing results below:

HW100T Shot Count Graph

Weihrauch HW100T with .175 Litre Air Cylinder (Standard Supply)

I also stock the FX lightweight air cylinders in 390mm and 500mm for those of you who are seeking to reduce their overall weight for competition work or are just searching for a lighter air rifle. Please note here that the FX air cylinder is longer but thinner with the advantage being that it weighs less than the Weihrauch air cylinder. The large Weihrauch air cylinder comes in at 869 grams, the HW100KT cylinder weighs 626 and the FX comes in at 651 grams. There is not much loss or gain between the 2 large cylinders other than the weight differential but you need to note that the FX is filled to 220 Bar and not the standard 200 Bar for the Weihrauch PCPs.

 HW100T FX Shot Count Graph

390mm FX Air Cylinder on a Weihrauch HW100T

Comparing these graphs individually is probably best done by looking at the following graph where we can see each of the 4 PCP air rifles together.

PCP Shot Count Graph

Shot Count Comparison HW100 Group

HW100T Power.

Below I have imported a Graph showing the power in Ft. Lbs. energy for 6 different pellet types when fired from a Weihrauch HW100KT in .22 calibre.

HW100KT Energy Graph

HW100KT Power in Ft Lbs.

Compare this with the Weihrauch HW100T in .22 cal below:

HW100T Energy Graph

HW100T Power in Ft Lbs.

These 2 Graphs will give you an idea of what power to expect from a Weihrauch HW100 in .22, but do remember this, no 2 air rifles are the same and these recordings should only be taken as “indicative” of the power available for these PCP air rifles.

 

The next question is going to be ‘what range will these air rifles shoot out to?’. Well put it this way guys, when we tested a bunch or air rifles a few weeks back, I had a customer shooting his brand new HW100T in .22 and he was hitting a 30mm disc at 100 metres 9 out of 10 times. This was done with a 12 power scope and the rifle zeroed in at 30 metres or thereabouts: furthermore, I don’t think he would mind me saying this, but he was ‘new’ to air rifles, especially PCPs.

 

I personally have a Weihrauch HW100T that is zeroed at 50 metres and I can hit a 20mm disc 10 out of 10 times at 96 metres (lasered) using a Hawke 8-32×56 Sidewinder. Does that answer that question OK?

Weihrauch HW100T and Sidewinder scope.

Weihrauch HW100T with Hawke Sidewinder 8-32 x 56 Scope.

Weihrauch HW100 Summary.

This article will be followed by another shortly as I get more and more involved with today’s PCP air rifles that never fail to impress. I am trying to appeal to beginners as well as you guys that have been using PCPs for a while now so as to cut through all the bullshit that floats around from some of the ‘experts’ in this field. My work profile means that I fire air rifles EVERY DAY guys, yup, every F…ing day, and from this experience I am trying to help build this fledgling air rifle following.

Please note that ALL the information, results and assertions are made in good faith from my experience and direct from my records. While I also stock and sell Evanix and AirForce PCP air rifles, there is no one PCP that out-shoots them all, contrary to the crap you sometimes read or watch on YouTube. As they say, there are ‘horses for courses’ and there are PCPs that will fit into that category you may be searching for, be it Weihrauch, Evanix or AirForce, one of which I am sure will get you covered.

Author: Ian McIntosh